GoddessGift.net
Ancient Mother Goddess Gifts and 'Herstorical' Information
to Honor, Nurture and Inspire!
  

  | Verified Secure Shopping! |      
 
      
Home | Privacy | Contact Us / About Us | Shipping | Feedback | Shopping Cart | Check Out | Links | Site Map

Materials/Finishes and Fair Trade   Refunds   Wholesale   Our Guarantee and Refund Policies  Gift Certificates

Search Our Site

Sale Pages
Up To 50% Off

What's New

Goddesses A-Z with Areas of Rule Listing

Our Products

On-Line Catalog
Gift Certificates
Newsletter
Product Categories:

Altars
Altar Cloths

Blessing Bowls
Candle Shrines
Cards

Charms
Curtains & Doorways
Chakra Banners

Dents and Dings Dept.

Drums
 Flags - Banners
Garden Statues
Gods and Heroes
Group Gifts
Jewelry
Magnets
Miniatures
Musical
Oil  and Incense Burners
Pendulums
Plaques
Rubber Stamps
Statues - Figurines
Stickers
Table Cloth-Runners
Tapestries
Unique Goddess Related Items
Wall Plaques
Jewelry:

Goddess Jewelry

Celtic Jewelry

Egyptian Jewelry

Metaphysical and Pagan Jewelry

Tarot Jewelry

Angel Jewelry

Rainbow Room OUT Mall Jewelry for LBGTQ

Goddesses Arranged By Culture:
African

Aztec and Mayan

Buddhist

Babylonian

Chinese

Christian:
Saints
, Angels, Biblical Heroes

Gnostic

Egyptian

Greek

Roman

Hindu

Middle Eastern

Native American

Neolithic

Modern

Norse

Slavic

Celtic

Pagan

Wiccan

Statues Related to:

Earth

Fertility

Fatherhood

Law

Medicine

Midwifery 

 Motherhood 
Testimonials
Articles
(c) 2001-2017
GoddessGift.net
Goddess Articles of Interest

CELEBRATING THE FEMININE DIVINE IN ANCIENT TIMES
~Fall and Winter~
(c)2007 Suzan Vaughn

Fall and Winter are seasons of the year when jubilant feasting and ceremony celebrated venerable goddesses in Egypt, Europe, Greece and Rome as ancient week-long rituals suspended routine activity in 82 BCE communities. As the wheel of the year turned toward winter solstice, the blessing of the Divine Feminine, the Goddess, was invoked.

Egyptians honored the Goddess Isis, who “made light with her feathers and wind with her wings." Isis, who caught departing souls in her wings and shepherded them to a new life;  Isis , the “Divine Mother, Oldest of the Old.”  

Professional singers, musicians, and dancers, mostly female, would perform at the temple during The Isia, a four day festival held October 31st  through November 3rd.  The love and healing Isis bestows on her husband-brother Osiris is the focus of perhaps the oldest mystery play known, predating those of Mesopotamia .

On the first day of The Isia, actors impersonating Isis, Nephthys, Anubis, Horus and others, along with entire communities, symbolically searched for the body of Osiris, scattered across Egypt by his brother and murderer Set. (Larson, Religion of the Occident.)

The fourteen portions of Osiris are found on the second day, and the goddess reconstitutes and resurrects her husband to immortal life.

In De Iside et Osiride, Plutarch writes that “On the third day the celebrants go down to the sea at night. They knead water from golden pots into fertile soil, mix in expensive spices, and sculpt a figure, then clothe and adorn it. The ritual ends with great shouting and jubilation that ‘Osiris is found.’”

One lovely rendition of the story tells of Isis turning into a sparrow hawk next, hovering over his body, and fanning breath back into him with her long, undulating golden wings. She then heals and resurrects him, their loving union resulting in the birth of the solar falcon, Horus.

Since the XIIth Dynasty, and probably much earlier, a sacred performance was held at several places including Abydos and Rome in which this scenario was repeated with very similar ritual. (Cumont, Oriental Religion, p97.)

Devotees believed that if Isis ’ healing and restorative power could work for Osiris, she could and would, as a result of their worship, heal them as well. (Larson, Religion of the Occident.)

In Rome, winter celebrants looked forward to The Saturnalia beginning December 18th and lasting seven days. It was a priestess who conducted the rites of the Saturnalia at Rome . (Seyffert and Lempriere, Dictionaries/Borlase, Dolmens III, pp9, 828.)

The guest of honor: an Italian Goddess of Plenty, Ops. This wife of Saturn shared equally the temple on the Capitol and the honors bestowed at the festival. Offerings were left at the temple, outdoor banquets took place, schools and courts were closed, work stopped, war was deferred, and no criminals were punished for the length of the festival.

Wax taper candles and dolls were likely found in the gift exchanges, and the observance included offering slaves not only every freedom, but also a banquet in their honor where they were served by their masters.

FOUNDATIONS OF CHRISTIAN CHRISTMAS

Some scholars say our present-day Christmas celebration, December 25th, is the same day that marks the birth of a divine child, often a virgin birth, in numerous traditions. Always a son, his name was Horus, Osiris, Helios, Dionysus, Pryderi, and Aeon, to name a few; and later Jesus.

In Egypt , the Goddess Isis gave birth to her son, the Sun God Horus.

In Mesopotamia , the Babylonian Goddess Astarte, Queen of Heaven, gave birth to a son, and the nativity of the son of the Persian Mermaid Goddess Atargatis is also celebrated on December 25th.