GoddessGift.net
Ancient Mother Goddess Gifts and 'Herstorical' Information
to Honor, Nurture and Inspire!
  

  | Verified Secure Shopping! |      
 
      
Home | Privacy | Contact Us / About Us | Shipping | Feedback | Shopping Cart | Check Out | Links | Site Map

Materials/Finishes and Fair Trade   Refunds   Wholesale   Our Guarantee and Refund Policies  Gift Certificates

Search
 

Ancient Goddess Information
A-Z with Areas of Rule Listing

 
On-Line Catalog  
Altars

Altar Cloths

Animal Familiar Statues and Jewelry

Blessing Bowls

Candle Shrines

Cards

Goddess Charms

Curtains & Doorways

Chakra Banners

Drums

 Flags - Banners

Garden Statues

Statues of Gods and Heroes

Group Gifts

Magnets

Miniatures

Oil  and Incense Burners

Pendulums

Plaques

Rubber Stamps

Stickers

Table Cloth-Runners

Tapestries

Unique Goddess Related Items

Wall Plaques
 

Sale Pages
Up To 50% Off

What's New

 
Jewelry:

Goddess Jewelry

Celtic Jewelry

Egyptian Jewelry

Metaphysical and Pagan Jewelry

Tarot Jewelry

Angel Jewelry

Rainbow Room OUT Mall Jewelry for LBGTQ

 
Goddess Statues, Jewelry, Flags and Banners Arranged By Culture:  
African

Aztec and Mayan

Buddhist

Babylonian

Chinese

Christian Statues:
Saints
, Angels, Biblical Heroes

Gnostic

Egyptian

Greek

Roman

Hindu

Middle Eastern

Native American

Neolithic

Modern

Norse

Slavic

Celtic

Pagan

Wiccan
 
Newsletter  
Gift Certificates  
Statues Related to:

Earth

Fertility

Fatherhood

Law

Medicine

Midwifery 

 
Motherhood 
 
Testimonials  
Articles  
(c) 2001-2017
GoddessGift.net
 
Sphinx and Oedipus Painting Information
Oedipus and the Sphinx Mythological Statue
Sphinx at the Gates of Thebes
Based on the painting by Gustave Moreau
The Sphinx and Oedipus

Oedipus' travels brought him to the place where guarding the gates of Thebes (in Greece) was a terrible monster with the body of a lion and the head and torso of a woman. She allowed no one to enter or leave the city without answering the riddle that she posed. If the traveler could not answer correctly, she would kill and devour him.

As no one had yet come up with the right answer, the sphinx was well-fed, and the city of Thebes was effectively cut off from all trade and all contact with the world outside the city walls.

When Oedipus reached the gates of the city, the creature posed her riddle:

What walks on four legs in the morning, two legs at noon, and three legs in the evening?

Oedipus solved the riddle, answering that man crawls on all fours in infancy, walks upright on two legs in adulthood, and uses a cane as a third leg in old age.

The sphinx was so frustrated that Oedipus had answered her riddle that she threw herself from the city walls, and died there on the road in front of the city that she had terrorized for so long. The Thebans were immensely grateful to Oedipus for having rid them of the monstrous sphinx.



Based on the painting Oedipus and the Sphinx, (1864)
by Gustave Moreau (1826-1898) -- French Painter

Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y.
Oil on canvas.

back to Greek Gods page