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Celtic Goddess Sheela Na Gig Statues
Sheela Na Gig Plaque
Sheela Na Gig Rubber Stamp
Sheela Na Gig Plaque Sheela Na Gig Plaque
5 inches High by about 4 inches wide
12.7 cm x 10.16 cm

Casting Stone Wall Plaque
Dark Brown with gold accented antiquing.
Ring on the back for hanging on the wall.

$25.00

#SS-SHE
Sheela Na Gig Bronze Statue sheela na gig bronze in hand sheela na gig back view  Sheela Na Gig Statue
4 inches high (10.16 cm high)


Cold cast faux bronze that's just a little bigger than the palm of the hand. This Sheela stands on her own just fine. She's a nice material, feels good to the touch, heavier weight (12 ounces), and paperweight sized and she's a popular addition to many an Irish bar!

-more photos here-

$45.00

  #SS-BZ-SHE
 
Sheela Na Gig Stamp  sheela na gig rubber stamp Sheela Na Gig Rubber Stamp
1.25 inches x 1.25 inches
3.17 cm x 3.17 cm

High Quality,100% red rubber mounted on straight-sided hardwood blocks
with a thick rubber sponge between the image and the block.

Letting her parts shine!

$ 8.00

#GU-KC9069

Sheela-Na-Gig:

 The Goddess Displaying Her Parts. This Celtic archetype of the Great Mother appeared in folk and church art by at least 1080 AD, but undoubtedly is of much earlier origin.

She may be identical with the war goddess Morrigan, consort to the Dagda. One of her images is found near the ancient goddess shrine of Avebury, where she symbolized fertility; displaying her sexual parts was believed to ward off evil.

Carvings of Sheela-na-Gigs may have accompanied the seasonal harvest custom of weaving corn dollies which dates from North European antiquity.
 
[Church of St. Mary and St. David. Kilpeck. Herefordshire, U.K. 850 A.D. Celtic Wall Hanging, 1140 CE]

Victorian prudery resulted in the defacement or destruction of large numbers of these figures. Some have been embellished. She is represented usually as a naked woman, squatting with knees apart, displaying her vulva and often presenting it with both hands. The term Sheela-Na-Gig means something like "Vulva-Woman."

Celts generally protected doorways with some female-genital fetish. Sheela-Na-Gig figures closely resembled the yonic statues of Kali which still appear at the entrance to Hindu temples. There, visitors lick a finger and touch the yoni for luck.

From the PJ Harvey Song-

Sheela na gigs (Síle na gcíoch in Irish) are figurative carvings of naked women displaying an exaggerated vulva. They are architectural grotesques found on churches, castles, and other buildings, particularly in Ireland and Great Britain, sometimes together with male figures.

One of the best examples may be found in the Round Tower at Rattoo, in County Kerry, Ireland. There is a replica of the round tower sheela na gig in the County Museum in Tralee town. Another well-known example may be seen at Kilpeck in Herefordshire, England.

Ireland has the greatest number of known sheela na gig carvings; McMahon and Roberts cite 101 examples in Ireland and an additional 45 examples in Britain.

Such carvings are said to ward off death and evil. Other grotesques, such as gargoyles and hunky punks, were frequently part of church decorations all over Europe. It is commonly said that their purpose was to keep evil spirits away. They often are positioned over doors or windows, presumably to protect these openings.