GoddessGift.net
Ancient Mother Goddess Gifts and 'Herstorical' Information
to Honor, Nurture and Inspire!
  

  | Verified Secure Shopping! |      
 
      
Home | Privacy | Contact Us / About Us | Shipping | Feedback | Shopping Cart | Check Out | Links | Site Map

Materials/Finishes and Fair Trade   Refunds   Wholesale   Our Guarantee and Refund Policies  Gift Certificates

Search
 

Ancient Goddess Information
A-Z with Areas of Rule Listing

 
On-Line Catalog  
Altars

Altar Cloths

Animal Familiar Statues and Jewelry

Blessing Bowls

Candle Shrines

Cards

Goddess Charms

Curtains & Doorways

Chakra Banners

Drums

 Flags - Banners

Garden Statues

Statues of Gods and Heroes

Group Gifts

Magnets

Miniatures

Oil  and Incense Burners

Pendulums

Plaques

Rubber Stamps

Stickers

Table Cloth-Runners

Tapestries

Unique Goddess Related Items

Wall Plaques
 

Sale Pages
Up To 50% Off

What's New

 
Jewelry:

Goddess Jewelry

Celtic Jewelry

Egyptian Jewelry

Metaphysical and Pagan Jewelry

Tarot Jewelry

Angel Jewelry

Rainbow Room OUT Mall Jewelry for LBGTQ

 
Goddess Statues, Jewelry, Flags and Banners Arranged By Culture:  
African

Aztec and Mayan

Buddhist

Babylonian

Chinese

Christian Statues:
Saints
, Angels, Biblical Heroes

Gnostic

Egyptian

Greek

Roman

Hindu

Middle Eastern

Native American

Neolithic

Modern

Norse

Slavic

Celtic

Pagan

Wiccan
 
Newsletter  
Gift Certificates  
Statues Related to:

Earth

Fertility

Fatherhood

Law

Medicine

Midwifery 

 
Motherhood 
 
Testimonials  
Articles  
(c) 2001-2017
GoddessGift.net
 
Rhea Greek Mother of the Gods and Goddesses Statue
Rhea Greek Goddess Statue

Rhea Greek Goddess Statue Rhea Greek Goddess Statue Rhea Greek Goddess Statue Rhea Greek Goddess Statue Rhea Greek Goddess Statue Rhea Greek Goddess Statue

 

Material:  Faux Bronze
Measures: 7 1/2" x 4" x 8" or 19.05 cm x 10.16 cm x 20.32 cm

Regularly:        $61.00
On Sale Now:  $49.99


#PT-10510

Rhea is the Titaness daughter of the earth goddess Gaia and the sky god Uranus, in Greek mythology and sister and wife to Cronus. In early traditions, she is known as "the mother of gods" and therefore is strongly associated with Gaia and Cybele, who have similar functions. The classical Greeks saw her as the mother of the Olympian goddesses and gods, but not as an Olympian goddess in her own right. The Romans identified her with Magna Mater (their form of Cybele), and the Goddess Ops.


Cronus sired six children by Rhea: Hestia, Hades, Demeter, Poseidon, Hera, and Zeus in that order, but swallowed them all as soon as they were born except Zeus, since Cronus had learned from Gaia and Uranus that he was destined to be overcome by his own child as he had overthrown his own father. When Zeus was about to be born, however, Rhea sought Uranus and Gaia to devise a plan to save him, so that Cronus would get his retribution for his acts against Uranus and his own children. Rhea gave birth to Zeus in Crete, handing Cronus a stone wrapped in swaddling clothes, which he promptly swallowed.

Then she hid Zeus in a cave on Mount Ida in Crete. According to varying versions of the story:

1. He was then raised by Gaia,

2. He was suckled by his first cousin, a goat named Amalthea, while a company of Kouretes, soldiers, or smaller gods, shouted and clashed their swords together to make noise so that Cronus would not hear the baby's cry,

3. He was raised by a nymph named Adamanthea, who fed him goat milk. Since Cronus ruled over the earth, the heavens, and the sea, Adamanthea hid him by dangling him on a rope from a tree so he was suspended between earth, sea, and sky and thus, invisible to his father.

Zeus forced Cronus to disgorge the other children in the reverse order in which they had been swallowed, the oldest becoming the last, and youngest: first.

Then Zeus released the brothers of Cronus, the Gigantes, the Hecatonkheires, and the Cyclopes, who gave him thunder and lightning, which had previously been hidden by Gaia. Zeus and his siblings, together with the Gigantes, Hecatonkheires, and Cyclopes, overthrew Cronus and the other Titans. Similarly, in later myths, Zeus would swallow Metis when she was pregnant with Athena, because of a prophecy that said she would later give birth to one who would be more glorious than the father. Athena was born unharmed, bursting out of his head in full armor.