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Senmut with Neferure Egyptian Statue


senmut wit neferure  senmut with neferure
Size:  7.75"H x 2.75"H x 5"D
Material: Resin with hand-painted color details
Weight (lbs):  4 lbs

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$51.00

#MW-EG02
Senmut and Neferure
Thebes (approx. 1475 B.C)


This beautiful Egyptian statue dates back to the early 18th Dynasty, when Hatshepsut and her stepson Thutmosis III ruled the Egyptian Empire.

The legendary Senmut was Hatshepsut's highest public official, confidant and perhaps also lover. He had served at court from the time her husband and half-brother Thutmosis II was still alive. Hatshepsut did not bear a son for her husband and so the throne went to one of the Pharaoh's extramarital sons.

After her husband's death, Hatshepsut was appointed as regent for the young Thutmosis III. Later on, she was also awarded the divine title of Pharaoh.

 Hatshepsut and Thutmosis II did have a daughter together, Princess Neferura. Senmut looked after her. The two must have been very close as Senmut had himself portrayed no less than seven times by various sculptors with the princess in his lap. This statue is viewed as one of the most beautiful.

On the front of the statue, Senmut had himself described as the princess' principal mentor and protector. The right-hand side of the base states that the sculpture is dedicated to the divine Hatshepsut.

The left-hand side describes the god Amun by means of his seven most important characteristics. It is probable that the statue was located in the Amun District of the temple complex at Karnak.

bastmore Egyptian Statues here